Let’s Play With ‘apt-cache’ Some More!

People use apt, and apt-get, all the time. We use it for the most basic things. We use apt to install, remove, and purge software. However, there’s apt-cache and it’s pretty handy.

A couple of days ago, I published an article about using apt-cache to find the official project homepages of your installed software. Today, I’m going to quickly cover some of the other things you can do with apt-cache. Obviously, if you don’t have apt and apt-cache then this article will do you exactly no good.

So, where to begin? Let’s just assume you’ve already installed inxi and you know how to open the terminal by pressing CTRL + ALT + T on your keyboard.

Done? Good, let’s get started!

First, if you want to display a bunch of generic information, you can use the following:

That will show you a bunch of information about a package. You don’t even have to have it installed. For this one, you will have to have the complete package name for it to be successful. In the next command, that’s not really required.

For example, you could type in ‘inx’ and it will find inxi, among other things. You can use that command with the ‘–full’ switch, and get a ton of information, like so:

Anyhow, you don’t even have to use an application name with the search. You can search for keywords and find applications that way. If you wanted to see what text editors you might have available (you’ll need to weed through them carefully) then you’d use this command:

Go ahead and give it a try. You might be surprised at the vast number of results you’ll get with that command. Seriously, it’s a lot of results. There’s probably some text editors you’ve never heard of before hidden among those results!

Next on the list is checking the policy. This way you can see what version is installed, what version is available, and you can even see what repository was the source for the application. It’s just as easy as the rest.

Among this giant, perhaps overwhelming, source of data are a couple of other neat things you can do. You can easily see both the dependencies and the reverse dependencies.

For clarity sake, the dependencies are the extra software that needs to be installed for the package in question to function. The reverse dependencies are what packages require the installation of the package in question in order to be fully functional.

To find the dependencies:

And the reverse dependencies:

And, there you have it. Those are the most common ways you’re going to use apt-cache. There are other ways and there is more information available, but those are pretty much all the ways you can expect to use it in the normal course of activities. If you want to know more, you can always check the man page. To do that, it’s just:

And, there’s one bonus round! There’s pretty much no good reason to run this, other than curiosity, but you can actually get some pretty cool stats about how many packages are available, how many are real packages, how many are virtual packages, and things like that. It’s a pretty simple command.

See? Another lovely way to use the terminal to gather information. I use the terminal nearly exclusively to manage my installed software.

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The Linux Foundation Hosts Project to Decentralize and Accelerate Drug Development for Rare Genetic Diseases

OpenTreatments and RareCamp creator Sanath Kumar Ramesh built the project to address his son’s rare disease, now that work will be available to all in an effort to accelerate treatments

SAN FRANCISCO, Calif., March 31, 2021 – The Linux Foundation, the nonprofit organization enabling mass innovation through open source, and the OpenTreatments Foundation, which enables treatments for rare genetic diseases regardless of rarity and geography, today announced the RareCamp software project will be hosted at the Linux Foundation. The Project will provide the source code and open governance for the OpenTreatments software platform to enable patients to create gene therapies for rare genetic diseases.

The project is supported by individual contributors, as well as collaborations from companies that include Baylor College of Medicine, Castle IRB, Charles River, Columbus Children’s Foundation, GlobalGenes, Odylia Therapeutics, RARE-X and Turing.com.

“OpenTreatments and RareCamp decentralize drug development and empowers patients, families and other motivated individuals to create treatments for diseases they care about. We will enable the hand off of these therapies to commercial, governmental and philanthropic entities to ensure patients around the world get access to the therapies for the years to come,” said Sanath Kumar Ramesh, founder of the OpenTreatments Foundation and creator of RareCamp.

There are 400 million patients worldwide affected by more than 7,000 rare diseases, yet treatments for rare genetic diseases are an underserved area. More than 95 percent of rare diseases do not have an approved treatment, and new treatments are estimated to cost more than $1 billion.

“If it’s not yet commercially viable to create treatments for rare diseases, we will take this work into our own hands with open source software and community collaboration is the way we can do it,” said Ramesh.

The RareCamp open source project provides open governance for the software and scientific community to collaborate and create the software tools to aid in the creation of treatments for rare diseases. The community includes software engineers, UX designers, content writers and scientists who are collaborating now to build the software that will power the OpenTreatments platform. The project uses the open source Javascript framework NextJS for frontend and the Amazon Web Services (AWS) Serverless stack – including AWS Lambda, Amazon API Gateway, and Amazon DynamoDB – to power the backend. The project uses the open source toolchain Serverless Framework to develop and deploy the software. The project is licensed under Apache 2.0 and available for anyone to use.

“OpenTreatments and RareCamp really demonstrate how technology and collaboration can have an impact on human life,” said Brett Andrews, RareCamp contributor and software engineer at Vendia. “Sanath’s vision is fueled with love for his son, technical savvy and the desire to share what he’s learning with others who can benefit. Contributing to this project was an easy decision.”

“OpenTreatments Foundation and RareCamp really represent exactly why open source and collaboration are so powerful – because they allow all of us to do more together than any one of us,” said Mike Dolan, executive vice president and GM of Projects at the Linux Foundation. “We’re honored to be able to support this community and are both confident and inspired about its impact on human lives.”

For more information and to contribute, please visit: OpenTreatments.org

About OpenTreatments Foundation

OpenTreatments Foundation’s mission is to enable treatments for all genetic diseases regardless of rarity and geography. Through the OpenTreatments software platform, patient-led organizations get access to a robust roadmap, people, and infrastructure necessary to build a gene therapy program. The software platform offers project management capabilities to manage the program while reducing time and money necessary for the development. For more information, please visit: OpenTreatments.org

About the Linux Foundation

Founded in 2000, the Linux Foundation is supported by more than 1,000 members and is the world’s leading home for collaboration on open source software, open standards, open data, and open hardware. Linux Foundation’s projects are critical to the world’s infrastructure including Linux, Kubernetes, Node.js, and more.  The Linux Foundation’s methodology focuses on leveraging best practices and addressing the needs of contributors, users and solution providers to create sustainable models for open collaboration. For more information, please visit us at linuxfoundation.org.

###

The Linux Foundation has registered trademarks and uses trademarks. For a list of trademarks of The Linux Foundation, please see our trademark usage page:  https://www.linuxfoundation.org/trademark-usage. Linux is a registered trademark of Linus Torvalds.

Media Contact

Jennifer Cloer
for the OpenTreatements Foundation
and Linux Foundation
503-867-2304
jennifer@storychangesculture.com

The post The Linux Foundation Hosts Project to Decentralize and Accelerate Drug Development for Rare Genetic Diseases appeared first on Linux Foundation.

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LF Networking Announces New Member Walmart, Bolsters a New Era of Enterprise Open Source Networking

  • Participation by the fortune 1 enterprise brings technical leadership and unprecedented scale to LFN projects across Network Management & Automation
  • Koby Avital, EVP of Technology Platforms, Walmart Global Tech, joins the Governing Board as LFN Platinum member
  • Community Growth signals ecosystem commitment to leverage open source for collaborative network transformation across Cloud, Enterprise and Service Provider Ecosystems.

SAN FRANCISCO– March 31, 2021 – LF Networking (LFN), the de-facto collaboration ecosystem for Open Source Networking projects, today announced that Walmart has joined as a Platinum member. Walmart is the first retail member of LFN and joins 21 other global organizations as Platinum members all working to accelerate open source networking.  

“We are thrilled to welcome Walmart to the LF Networking community,” said Arpit Joshipura, general manager, Networking, Edge and IoT, at the Linux Foundation. “As the world’s largest retailer, Walmart brings expertise across a broad swath of areas, including retail point of sale networking, enterprise IT, and hybrid cloud deployments.  We look forward to collaborative efforts that accelerate the open source networking community.”

“I’m excited to join the Linux Foundation Governing Board on behalf of Walmart,” said Koby Avital, Executive Vice President, Walmart Global Tech. “By joining LFN, Walmart has the opportunity to contribute, influence the cloud growth and better support the enterprise and service provider communities by open-sourcing innovative technologies across its retail infrastructure.”

Join the LF Networking community October 11-12 for Open Networking and Edge Summit (ONES), the industry’s premier open networking event, expanded to comprehensively cover Edge Computing, Edge Cloud & IoT. ONES North America enables collaborative development and innovation across enterprises, service providers/telcos and cloud providers to shape the future of networking and edge computing. Details here: https://events.linuxfoundation.org/open-networking-edge-summit-north-america/.

About the Linux Foundation

The Linux Foundation is the organization of choice for the world’s top developers and companies to build ecosystems that accelerate open technology development and industry adoption. Together with the worldwide open source community, it is solving the hardest technology problems by creating the largest shared technology investment in history. Founded in 2000, The Linux Foundation today provides tools, training and events to scale any open source project, which together deliver an economic impact not achievable by any one company. More information can be found at www.linuxfoundation.org.

The Linux Foundation has registered trademarks and uses trademarks. For a list of trademarks of The Linux Foundation, please see our trademark usage page: https://www.linuxfoundation.org/trademark-usage.

Linux is a registered trademark of Linus Torvalds.

# # #

The post LF Networking Announces New Member Walmart, Bolsters a New Era of Enterprise Open Source Networking appeared first on Linux Foundation.

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USN-4898-1: curl vulnerabilities

Viktor Szakats discovered that curl did not strip off user credentials
from referrer header fields. A remote attacker could possibly use this
issue to obtain sensitive information. (CVE-2021-22876)

Mingtao Yang discovered that curl incorrectly handled session tickets when
using an HTTPS proxy. A remote attacker in control of an HTTPS proxy could
use this issue to bypass certificate checks and intercept communications.
This issue only affected Ubuntu 20.04 LTS and Ubuntu 20.10.
(CVE-2021-22890)

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USN-4897-1: Pygments vulnerability

Ben Caller discovered that Pygments incorrectly handled parsing certain
files. If a user or automated system were tricked into parsing a specially
crafted file, a remote attacker could cause Pygments to hang or consume
resources, resulting in a denial of service.
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