Install ‘Docky’ on Ubuntu 20.04+

Docky is a Linux application that provides a dock for applications you’d frequently use. It’s no longer in the default repositories. This is how you install Docky on newer versions of Ubuntu. 

First, open your terminal.

Next, you’ll need Docky’s dependencies:

Now, let’s install them all at once:

Alright, you’ve now taken care of the dependencies. Let’s grab the Docky .deb:

And, of course, you can now install it:

There. You now have a running/working Docky and you can customize it and use it just like you did on older versions of Ubuntu. This should, of course, work with all official flavors of Ubuntu and with those distros that base themselves on Ubuntu’s 20.04+ version.

Smash a Button
[Total: 1 Average: 4]
About Me: I'm just some retired dude with a little bit more free time on my hands. If you want to support the site, why not help yourself out too by ordering some inexpensive web hosting so that you can start your own site?


Check Your Ubuntu Support Status

Want to know how long your version of Ubuntu is supported? You can find the support status by cracking open your terminal and entering:

[code]]czoyMTpcInVidW50dS1zdXBwb3J0LXN0YXR1c1wiO3tbJiomXX0=[[/code]

If you’re using 20.04 or newer, then the command is slightly different:

[code]]czoyMjpcInVidW50dS1zZWN1cml0eS1zdGF0dXNcIjt7WyYqJl19[[/code]
Smash a Button
[Total: 0 Average: 0]
About Me: I'm just some retired dude with a little bit more free time on my hands. If you want to support the site, why not help yourself out too by ordering some inexpensive web hosting so that you can start your own site?


Use Wayland in a Live Instance of Ubuntu

This is from an AU question that I answered. The person wanted to know how to use Wayland while in a live instance of Ubuntu. It is something you can do.

The first thing you need to do, assuming you’re already booted into the live instance of Ubuntu, is change the way you login. You can click in the bottom right and ‘Show Applications.’ Once there, you can enter the word ‘users’, click on the settings app offered, and disable logging in automatically.

When you’re done with that, change the password. It turns out this is mandatory – and perhaps a bug. You’ll need to deal with Ubuntu’s need for a complex password, so just make sure it’s at least 12 characters long, not a dictionary word, and has a mix of numbers and letters. Yes, even in the live instance that’s temporary they want a complex password meeting whatever criteria they set.

Next, you want to edit /etc/gdm3/custom.conf and comment out the line that disables Wayland.

Find the line:

Change it to:

Make sure to save it, obviously.

Restart gdm3 with:

Note: That may log you out, that’s fine. If it doesn’t automatically, log out manually.

Log back in, but after you click the user, there’s an icon in the lower right. It’s a gear icon. Click it and choose  Ubuntu on Wayland. Then enter your password and press ENTER.

If everything worked, you’re logged in with Wayland.

Now, to verify this…

Press CTRL + ALT + T and open the terminal and enter:

Which should tell you that you’re using Wayland. If done correctly, it looks like this:

Good luck!

Smash a Button
[Total: 0 Average: 0]
About Me: I'm just some retired dude with a little bit more free time on my hands. If you want to support the site, why not help yourself out too by ordering some inexpensive web hosting so that you can start your own site?